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with jim davis, executive director of the colorado department of public safety. he's also chair of the national governor's association homeland security advisors council. among big events he's worked on was the 2008 democratic national convention in denver. and ed cannon, currently of t&m protection resources, a private security consulting firm. he was formerly an assistant chief of the new york city police department, and helped set up security for that city's marathon and many other events. well, jim davis, starting with you, how does boston change things for people in your position? what kinds of discussions are going on now? >> well, certainly we're much more focused on security. you know, in the united states we've got pretty short memories and i think after 9/11 we were very focused on security and then things kind of we'd go through a time period where we don't a lot of attacks or any successful attacks and now boston happens and people get focused on it again. i think that in the -- in law enforcement and intelligence community we've always been focused on it but people
[ ♪ theme ♪ ] >> stephanie: any way jim so i'm saying to jacki schechner when she's in my bed yesterday morning along with a bunch of other people -- >> what? >> stephanie: i'm sorry the camera is on. >> along with a bunch of other people? [ laughter ] >> stephanie: little titillating. i had a dinner party saturday night and it had more to do with -- jacki, we all partied a little hardy. it was a big slumber party. >> very responsible in l.a. if you're going to consume too many adult beverages to make the decision not to drive so that's what we did. lucky enough, stephanie has a home that's decorated like a bed and breakfast and you can pick your room. >> stephanie: exactly. just saying. not what you thought. >> would you like the naked marilyn photograph room. would you like the country breakfast room? >> stephanie: all right. anyway, i was trying to get jim's attention. good morning jacki. thank god it was a slow "newsweek" last week. >> we have lily tomlin today. >> stephanie: here's jacki schechner. >> happy monday. governor deval patrick is asking massachusetts residents
-three minutes after the hour. jim ward on air guitar. 1-800-steph-1-2 the phone number toll free from anywhere. todd in idaho, you are on the "stephanie miller show." hi, todd. >> caller: hi, how are ya? i was wondering why no one was talking about the warrantless access that the s.w.a.t. teams went from house to house in boston, i don't know if i would allow that. is that legal? >> stephanie: the house-to-house searches? >> caller: yeah. they have to have a warrant to do that, don't they? >> stephanie: i don't -- you know -- wow, i'm not certain. >> you would think. >> caller: i mean you were talking earlier about we live in a land of laws and that's one of the biggest ones -- >> how do you know they didn't have a warrant? >> caller: well, that's what i'm wondering. >> i think with something as high-pro file as this they wouldn't screw something like that up. >> stephanie: the miranda rights not being read right away -- clearly that was an emergency. perhaps i'm not as versed of my civil liberties as i should be. >> in danger of being punted. >> stephanie: exactly. >> talking
korea. jim maseda joins us from seoul. hi, jim. >> reporter: hi, kelly. well, the past 24 hours have been a pretty good example of the unpredictability of kim junk union and his scene. after all of those signals, it turned out to be a very quiet day in north korea, focused entirely on those celebrations around founding father kim jong il's birthday. but then last night, there was a sudden new threat from the north korean military, which said it would strike south korea without warning if there were another anti-north protest in the south. so this was in reaction to a very small demonstration yesterday here in downtown seoul where a couple of effigies of kim jong un were burned. in the same message, he said the south must apologize for its undig phied acts before talks could happen. despite the angry ultimatum, there does seem to be a shift now towards what they call offramping or tamping down the volume and talking rather than confrontation. that said, those two medium range missiles are reportedly on their launchers in the eastern part of north korea ready to be fired. the south is
force discussed their findings on >> thank you, jim, and thank you for your leadership on the task force, and i want to express my thanks to the constitution project, but also to all of my fellow task force members, what they brought to the table in terms of experience, wisdom, public service, really made a difference in the development of this project and important report. there's more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those this morning, but we do want to hit some of the highlights. we hope you'll take the entire report, study it through, and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it's important because we as a nation have to get this right. i look back in history to the time during world war ii that we interned some japanese- americans. at the time it seemed like the right and proper thing to do. but in the light of history, it was an error. and so today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post- 9/11 environment. were's some key questions wanted to address this morning. one is the treatment
reform was being debated former senator jim demint from south carolina told his colleagues the need to vote against obama cared cared we need to break the obama administration. senator mcconnell for senate majority leader from the republicans announcing in 2010 that his highest priority, the senate majority leader was making barack obama the one-term president. if we had a coalition presidency were each party would elect a partner it wouldn't stand to gain as much clinical opposition. no matter what they did it was still share the white house with the other party so then it would be much freer to judge legislative proposals on their merits. so to put it another way, it's not surprising when you have a winner-take-all election for presidency whose power has grown to a level of the presidency you shouldn't be surprised that we have high levels of partisan conflict. indeed if you go back the increase in partisan conflict, to go back to the 50s and 60's there is much more of a cross party lines. if you look at partisan conflict graph it has risen since the 40s in the 50s grassley to lev
promise to find it just for you right here on "mad money." i'm jim cramer. thank you, everybody. see you tomorrow! >>> good evening, everyone. i'm larry kudlow. this is "the kudlow report." let's get started right away. the big story today a shocking but fake tweet and from the associated press and set off a steep stock market selloff and then just as suddenly, a stock market rebound. what on earth happened? cnbc's own eamon javers joins us with this incredible story. good evening. >> it was a really bizarre turn of events starting at 1:07:00 p.m. here's the tweet that the a.p. account put out at that minute. it said, "breaking" two explosions in the white house and barack obama is injured. that was a fake report as a result of a hack attack against the a.p. twitter account. but it set off this reaction in the dow jones industrial average, as you see from the chart, a huge spike down on that news. down about 143 points at the bottom. and then bouncing right back up, all of that happening within the space of about three minutes. and by sheer coincidence, the white house briefing was set t
county police chief jim johnson, assault weapons are -- quote -- "meant for the battlefield." milwaukee chief of police, ed flynn, "military characteristics are not simply cosmetic in nature. these weapons are designed for combat." end quote. and john walsh, the united states attorney for colorado couldn't be more clear. "these weapons, he said, "are crafted to be as effective as possible at killing human beings." end quote. now, where are we today? seven states and the district of columbia banned assault weapons prior to the newtown, massacre. these are my own state, california, connecticut, d.c., hawaii, maryland, massachusetts, new york, and new jersey. since newtown, legislators in 20 states have introduced bills to either ban assault weapons or strengthen existing bans. 20 states are now contemplating action. connecticut and new york passed laws to tighten their existing bans, to prohibit assault weapons with one military characteristic, which is what we do in this bill. maryland expanded an existing ban on assault pistols to cover rifles and assault shotguns. in massachusetts and
, that is the --. >> host: charles there is tweet relating to what you're saying. jim writes can an american citizen be considered an enemy combatant? >> guest: absolutely goes back to the civil war. goes certainly to world war ii. anwar al-awlaki was american-born. president obama use ad drone to kill him in the wilds of yemen. if you, if you fill eight yourself with enemy forces and you go to war against american citizens and you kill americans will fully and you do so on behalf of a movement or enemy forces then indeed you can be considered an enemy combatant. being a enemy combatant simply because you're an american citizen. if in world war ii you went over and joined nazi forces were you not a enemy combatant? of course you were. . . >> he didn't treat those terrible tragedies as access war, but appropriately treated them as heinous criminal acts to be investigated, prosecuted, and appropriately punishes. >> host: al-alwaki was an american citizen, kimed on orders of president obama. did president obama violate the constitution by doing that? >> guest: well, actually, we have a lawsuit in which
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9